Our Guests

Wooleen Stations tourism enterprise aims to cultivate a deeper understanding of our environment and connection to country. Guests come to Wooleen Station to experience the vast open spaces of the outback, diverse flora and fauna and resilient landscape – its an amazing place to watch mother nature at work. It is now our goal on Wooleen to return our pastoral lease back to a flourishing, diverse, ecologically stable and productive landscape.

A key inspiration to help us achieve this is to invite the guests who stay with us to understand the wonders of the Mulga Shrub Lands and the surrounding environment. This comes through the interpretation of the environment, the birdlife, the wildlife, and the history and heritage of this ancient landscape. We enjoy hearing ideas and discussion with our guests surrounding landscape rehabilitation and offer understanding through the day to day operations of life at Wooleen.

We firmly believe that tourism should help nurture conservation and rehabilitation of our natural and cultural heritage. It is our goal that you leave connected to country, aware of your surroundings and aware of the choices you are making in life. We want you to share our journey and make it your own..

The West Australian rangelands (or The Outback) are described as a renewable resource, but this is only true if we manage the land so that it is able to renew itself. This is a huge consideration when deciding upon tourism activities at the station and careful thought is given to walk-trails, self-drive routes, campsites and more.

We also make more subtle choices to lower our impact on the environment. For example our guest amenities range, Ritual Australia, is made from indigenous active botanical ingredients sourced from virtually every part of the country. Revenue generated from this guest amenity goes towards sustainable programs and on going support to indigenous communities. The contents is environmentally friendly and the package biodegradable. Our power is sourced almost entirely from solar panels and wind turbines and then stored in batteries to draw from when needed. We avoid the use of high powered appliances and don’t own electric kettles or toasters. In the homestead we attempt to grow us much of our own food as possible, the vegetable garden is always a hub of activity.

“Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find reserves of strength that will endure as long as life lasts. There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of nature — the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after winter.”
― Rachel Carson, Silent Spring

 

Wooleen vegetables

Homegrown broccoli in the Wooleen vegetable garden